Early stardom

During this biography, you will see a selection of sound players like the one below. You can listen to the song while reading the page.

In the 1930s, he was to sign two contracts which were to change his fortunes — one in May 1931 with Roy Fox, singing in his live band for the Monseigneur Restaurant in London, the other a record contract with Ray Noble’s orchestra in November 1930.

During the next four years, he recorded over 500 songs. By 1933 Lew Stone had ousted Fox as bandleader, and Bowlly was singing Stone’s arrangements with Stone’s band. After much radio exposure and a successful UK tour with Stone, Bowlly was inundated with demands for personal appearances and gigs—including undertaking a subsequent solo UK tour – but continued to make the bulk of his recordings with Noble. There was considerable competition between Noble and Stone for Bowlly’s time, as for much of the year, Bowlly would spend all day in the recording studio with Noble’s band, rehearsing and recording, only to then spend the evening playing live at the Monseigneur with Stone’s band.